Sony SLT-A65V 24.3 MP Digital SLR with Translucent Mirror Technology – Body Only

Sony SLT-A65V 24.3 MP Digital SLR with Translucent Mirror Technology – Body Only

Sony SLT-A65V 24.3 MP Digital SLR with Translucent Mirror Technology - Body Only

  • 2nd Generation Translucent Mirror Technology camera
  • 24.3 MP for superb detail and amazing enlargements
  • Ultra-fast up to 10 fps continuous shooting with Auto Focus
  • World’s first OLED viewfinder; big and bright
  • World’s first HD Movie mode with AVCHD 60p/60i/24p

Best of both worlds, 24.3 megapixel and up to 10 fps. Get action photos, HD Movies and Live View shots that other cameras miss, thanks to Sony’s exclusive Translucent Mirror Technology. Enjoy smooth and creative HD video at full 1920 x 1080 resolution – at either 60p or 24p frame rate – plus the world’s first OLED electronic viewfinder.2

List Price: $ 999.99


Sony Alpha a6000 24.3 MP Digital SLR Camera - Black (Body Only)

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Sony Alpha a6300 24.2 MP Digital SLR Camera - Black (Body Only) + 32GB SDHC Card
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  1. Reply
    Alex Parker July 22, 2016 at 11:03 am
    145 of 151 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    To A65 or to A55? That is the Question.., November 14, 2011

    This review is from: Sony SLT-A65V 24.3 MP Digital SLR with Translucent Mirror Technology – Body Only (Electronics)

    Sony A55 vs. A65: is Newer Really Better?

    When Sony released info on the Nex-5N, NEX-7, a65 and a77 models, I decided that the technological leaps on the new line was enough to make me a believer. What really put me into the Sony system over Canon and Nikon was the lower price points on the Sony lenses. Yeah, they don’t have as many lenses as the Big Two, but I don’t know any photographers with 25+ lenses in their closet, either. The NEX-5N looked nice but I like viewfinders and didn’t want to be gouged on that accessory. The NEX-7–while pricey–still doesn’t have a release date. The a65 was priced below the a77 by almost $500, so that was a no-brainer, but was it $200-worth more than the a55, a camera that–for the most part–touts a devout ownership?

    I actually bought the a65 and the a55 at the same time, opting for the a65 because of its corrected overheating issue while filming video (the tie-breaker for many) and the a55 because, aside from the overheating issue (a “logical” deal-breaker for many with the arrival of the a65), it offers just about everything else the a65 does, minus some cosmetic differences and a handful of megapixels most of us will never use or need.

    First, the differences. The a65’s swivel LCD is a nice little touch over the a55’s traditional vertical flip-out. With the rotating swivel I was able to take shots by holding the camera down low and high over my head. The LCD view on this unit is crystal clear. The electronic viewfinder on the a65 is superior to the a55. (**I’m not going to get into the differences between the OVF and Sony’s EVF; if you are reading this, it’s because you’re either used to EVFs in general, don’t mind them, or think Sony cameras are cool, regardless.) The EVF here offers a FULL view of my shots. Also, if you use the EVF instead of the LCD, there is a level meter that basically tells you if your shot is in focus, and if your horizon/vanishing points are perfectly level; this is invaluable if you’re taking landscape or wide shots. When shooting people it eventually recognizes redundant faces and will instantly articulate in on the principle person you’re shooting automatically if they are in a crowd or shot with multiple people; this I also found to be a rather nice innovation and would be tremendous if I were shooting a wedding and only cared about the bride, for example. The thing that I liked most about the a65 over the a55 however was completely unexpected: on the a65 there is a dedicated ISO button next to the aperture/shutter wheel, and next to it is a dedicated exposure button that will give you accurate adjustments in the EVF before you shoot. AWESOME. After a couple hours of shooting with this unit I could easily toggle between the Aperture, ISO and exposure intuitively by simply moving my finger slightly from one button to the next. In this regard, making on the fly adjustments while shooting on the street was a snap.

    One cosmetic/function quirk that really bugged me on the a65: the frame-zoom button is in a weird place. Located in the top right behind the wheel and shutter button, I kept hitting it by accident and it was quite annoying. I also didn’t like how it basically took me a day and a half to 1) find the playback function for video and 2) toggle back and forth between video and regular picture playback mode. After two days I still didn’t know how to download the video off of the card. It was like Easter egg hunting! Also, some of the novelty shooting camera modes looked like fun when I first powered up, but I quickly realised that the shooting potential of this camera was so great that I’d actually be doing a disservice by being too cute with the toy functions. The regular shooting and BW modes were all I truly needed to get really impressive results.

    The a55 by contrast shoots just a clip slower¬¬–though the AF is just as snappy–with little discernable difference, unless you put the camera in review mode to look at shots after you take them, then it sorta bricks out for longer seconds than its successor. (**On the a65 the review mode is default to OFF.) The a55 is also decidedly lighter in weight. I will note that because I have egregiously long fingers, it was actually a less comfortable handle than the a65, and I almost felt like the two models are specifically tailored to different hand-types. Actually, this is a BIG DEAL if you don’t care about cute functions: if you have little hands and generally prefer light equipment, the a55 (at $200 less I remind you) carries more value in day-to-day carrying and shooting. If you have bigger hands, the a65 is an absolute must, you will thank me later.

    Finally, the video mode. On the a65 the quality on the 60i is far superior to anything I’ve ever seen on a DSLR, hands down. I actually wanted the a65 because it shot in “cinematic” 24p, but I can attest that compared to the 60i on this unit it left a lot to be desired. If you are…

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  2. Reply
    J. Donaldson July 22, 2016 at 11:50 am
    55 of 57 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Compared to the Sony A55, April 16, 2013
    J. Donaldson (Redding, CA USA) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Sony SLT-A65V 24.3 MP Digital SLR with Translucent Mirror Technology – Body Only (Electronics)

    I had a Sony A55 for just over two years. Unfortunately it failed twice and I’ve had to send it out for several weeks to a repair shop both times. I do think this is unusual and it is the first camera I’ve ever had that failed on me. I decided to step up to the A65 and keep the A55 as a backup. I’m a little miffed at Sony for the poor A55 reliability but I do think it isn’t common. I’d have a hard time switching away from Sony. First I have a large investment in three lenses. Second I really like the translucent mirror technology and all it brings to the party. I think Sony is pushing the envelope and the camera has some really nice features.

    Here are my observations on the A65 compared to the A55.

    There are a number of web sites that you can use to compare the A55 to the A65 so I won’t elaborate on the specification differences. But I did find some things about the camera that I had not read about, and of course there are my personal observations too.

    1) The weight difference between the lighter A55 and the A65 is quite noticeable to me. I used the A55 a lot and was very familiar with how it felt hanging from my wrist by the wrist strap. The truth is the three lenses I have add so much weight that the overall weight difference with the new body isn’t really that much. I’ll get over it.

    2) Size. The A65 is larger but not so much as to resemble one of the huge bodies of other DSLR cameras that just look obnoxious to me. The main benefit of the larger body is the hand grip now is comfortable. The A55 grip was initially too small for me (I think I have average man’s hands) and it never felt better with time.

    3) The extra megapixels. I’ve never been chasing megapixels. I was quite happy with the image quality of the 16MP A55. So I was quite surprised when I took the first few photographs with the A65 and it’s 24MP sensor. I was blown away with the quality improvement, something not born out by all of the technical reviews on the camera. After several hundred photos I’ve taken over the week I’ve had the camera I continue to be impressed. The other big benefit is I can crop images on my computer and still have really good image quality even if I’ve zoomed in 4x or so. Very nice.

    4) Expecting a lot from the OLED viewfinder that is so highly touted in the reviews it just didn’t jump out at me. I’ll have to wait until the A55 comes back from repair and compare the two. It does look larger but if I didn’t know there was a published big difference I might not have noticed. I am quite pleased with both the A55 and A65 EVFs. After a week of use I have to say the EFV is good, but not so I marvel at it.

    5) Sony did move some buttons around a bit and for the most part I like the changes. The Video, AEL and tele-converter buttons are moved off the top a bit more and are easier to access and depress. The other buttons on the top of the camera near the shutter have been moved closer to the shutter so they are easier to access.

    6) I see Sony decided to put a dedicated ISO button by the shutter button, but they removed the D-Range button. This is a big disappointment to me. It may be that more sophisticated shooters play with ISO a lot but I don’t do it often enough for a dedicated button on the top of the camera. On the other hand I did use the D-Range button a lot. I find a lot of high contrast shots are better handled by the Auto HDR feature. Gratefully I was able to reprogram the ISO button to activate D-Range but now my D-Range button is labeled ISO!

    7) I’m so glad the stereo microphone is colored black rather than the silver shown in many photos of the camera.

    8) The A55 has an infrared focus assist while the A65 uses the flash. I don’t know which has better performance but I really like the infrared action over the flash. It is much more subtle.

    9) The On/Off button on the A55 has a nice crisp snap to it whereas the A65 feels soft and mushy.

    10) Placement of the small red Access Lamp (used to show when files are accessed on the SD card) is better on the A65. The A55 was too low and small. No big deal either way though.

    11) I REALLY like the shutter sound. The camera comes with the Front Curtain Shutter ON. When ON the first shutter action is electronic instead of the physical curtain moving. This means there is only one shutter sound per shutter release where as the A55 has a double click. The camera has a nice crisp sound for each photo. A big bonus is the shutter will have 1/2 the operations this way which should extend the life of the shutter. It was a fail of the shutter on the A55 which has it in the repair shop presently.

    12) When the A65 processes the Auto HDR images it takes much longer than on the A55. I suppose this is due to the larger image size. It is quite noticeable to me.

    13) I may be wrong about this but when reviewing images on the A55…

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